Global Industrial Automation Control Market 2014-2018

The analysts forecast the Global Industrial Automation Control market to grow at a CAGR of 6.87 percent over the period 2013-2018. One of the key factors contributing to this market growth is the increasing demand for automation control systems from the Oil and Gas industry. The Global Industrial Automation Control market has also been witnessing the increased availability of wireless sensor networking solutions. However, the reluctance among end-users to migrate to the latest technology could pose a challenge to the growth of this market.

Key vendors dominating this space include ABB Ltd., Honeywell International Inc., Rockwell Automation Inc., and Siemens AG.

Other vendors mentioned in the report are Applied Material Inc., Apriso Corp., Aspen Technologies Inc., Camstar Systems Inc., Control Systems International Inc., Emerson Electric Co., Eyelite Inc., GE Co., Invensys plc., Metso Corp., Miracom Inc., Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Omron Corp., SAP AG, Schneider Electric SA, Toshiba International Corp., Werum Software & Systems AG, and Yokogawa Electric Corp.

Commenting on the report, an analyst from the team said: The increased availability of wireless sensor networking solutions in SCADA-based industrial control systems is one of the major emerging trends witnessed in the Global Industrial Automation Control market in recent years. Wireless sensor networking systems help enterprises overcome certain issues related to the rigid architecture of SCADA such as inflexibility and centralized architecture. With this technology, deployment of sensors in SCADA-based industrial control systems becomes easier as it provides wireless networking access. For instance, in the Energy and Power industry, sensors are generally deployed in either production or induction wells. Through wireless sensor technology, the sensors can be deployed inside gas pipelines in a cost-effective manner, thereby resulting in enhanced process efficiency of the plants.

According to the report, one of the major drivers in this market is the increasing demand for automation control systems from the Oil and Gas industry. Effective deployment of automation solutions helps companies improve their productivity and enhance their monitoring and security systems.

[toggle title_open=”Table of Contents” title_closed=”Table of Contents” hide=”yes” border=”yes” style=”default” excerpt_length=”0″ read_more_text=”Read More” read_less_text=”Read Less” include_excerpt_html=”no”]01. Executive Summary
02. List of Abbreviations
03. Scope of the Report
03.1 Market Overview
03.2 Product Offerings
04. Market Research Methodology
04.1 Market Research Process
04.2 Research Methodology
05. Introduction
06. Market Landscape
06.1 Market Size and Forecast
06.2 Five Forces Analysis
07. Market Segmentation by Product
07.1 Global DCS Market
Market Size and Forecast
07.2 Global PLC Market
Market Size and Forecast
07.3 Global SCADA Market
Market Size and Forecast
07.4 Global MES Market
Market Size and Forecast
08. Market Segmentation by End-user
08.1 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in Process Industries
Market Size and Forecast
08.2 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Power Industry
Market Size and Forecast
08.3 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Oil and Gas Industry
Market Size and Forecast
08.4 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Pharmaceutical Industry
Market Size and Forecast
08.5 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Food and Beverage Industry
Market Size and Forecast
08.6 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Pulp and Paper Industry
Market Size and Forecast
08.7 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Chemical and Petrochemical Industry
Market Size and Forecast
08.8 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in Discrete Industries
Market Size and Forecast
08.9 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Automotive Industry
Market Size and Forecast
08.10 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Packaging Industry
Market Size and Forecast
08.11 Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Textile Industry
Market Size and Forecast
09. Geographical Segmentation
09.1 Industrial Automation Control Market in the Americas
Market Size and Forecast
09.2 Industrial Automation Control Market in the EMEA Region
Market Size and Forecast
09.3 Industrial Automation Control Market in the APAC Region
Market Size and Forecast
10. Buying Criteria
11. Market Growth Drivers
12. Drivers and their Impact
13. Market Challenges
14. Impact of Drivers and Challenges
15. Market Trends
16. Trends and their Impact
17. Vendor Landscape
17.1 Competitive Scenario
17.1.1 Key News
17.1.2 Key Acquisitions
17.2 Market Share Analysis 2013
17.3 Other Prominent Vendors
18. Key Vendor Analysis
18.1 ABB Ltd.
18.1.1 Business Overview
18.1.2 Key Information
18.1.3 SWOT Analysis
18.2 Honeywell International Inc.
18.2.1 Business Overview
18.2.2 Key Information
18.2.3 SWOT Analysis
18.3 Rockwell Automation Inc.
18.3.1 Business Overview
18.3.2 Business Segmentation
18.3.3 Key Information
18.3.4 SWOT Analysis
18.4 Siemens AG
18.4.1 Business Overview
18.4.2 Employee Structure by Region
18.4.3 R&D Facilities by Region
18.4.4 Key Information
18.4.5 SWOT Analysis
19. Other Reports in this Series
List of Exhibits
Exhibit 1: Global Industrial Automation Control Market by Product Segmentation
Exhibit 2: Global Industrial Automation Control Market by End-user Segmentation 2013
Exhibit 3: Market Research Methodology
Exhibit 4: Global Industrial Automation Control Market 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 5: Global Industrial Automation Control Market by Product Segmentation
Exhibit 6: Global Industrial Automation Control Market by Product Segmentation 2013-2018
Exhibit 7: Global DCS Market 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 8: Global PLC Market 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 9: Global SCADA Market 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 10: Global MES Market 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 11: Global Industrial Automation Control Market by End-user Segmentation 2013
Exhibit 12: Global Industrial Automation Control Market by End-user Segmentation 2013
Exhibit 13: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in Process Industries 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 14: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in Process Industries 2013
Exhibit 15: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Power Industry 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 16: Consumption and Production of Electricity by Key Leading Countries 2011 and 2012
Exhibit 17: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Oil and Gas Industry 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 18: Consumption and Production of Oil by Key Leading Countries 2009 and 2010
Exhibit 19: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Pharmaceutical Industry 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 20: Pharmaceutical Industry CAGR in China, India, Russia, and Brazil 2010-2015
Exhibit 21: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Food and Beverage Industry 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 22: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Pulp and Paper Industry 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 23: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Chemical and Petrochemical Industry 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 24: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in Process Industries 2013-2018
Exhibit 25: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in Discrete Industries 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 26: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in Discrete Industries 2013
Exhibit 27: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Automotive Industry 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 28: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Packaging Industry 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 29: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in the Textile Industry 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 30: Global Industrial Automation Control Market in Discrete Industries 2013-2018
Exhibit 31: Global Industrial Automation Control Market by Geographical Segmentation 2013
Exhibit 32: Global Industrial Automation Control Market by Geographical Segmentation 2018
Exhibit 33: Industrial Automation Control Market in the Americas 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 34: Industrial Automation Control Market in the EMEA Region 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 35: Industrial Automation Control Market in the APAC Region 2013-2018 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 36: Global Industrial Automation Control Market 2013-2018
Exhibit 37: Global Industrial Automation Control Market by Vendor Segmentation 2013
Exhibit 38: Business Segmentation of ABB Ltd.
Exhibit 39: Revenue of Honeywell International Inc. by Business Segment 2010-2012 (US$ billion)
Exhibit 40: Business Segmentation of Honeywell International Inc.
Exhibit 41: Business Segmentation of Rockwell Automation Inc.
Exhibit 42: Revenue of Rockwell Automation Inc. by Business Segment 2011 and 2012
Exhibit 43: Revenue of Rockwell Automation Inc. by Geographical Segmentation 2011 and 2012
Exhibit 44: Revenue of Siemens AG by Geographical Segmentation 2011 and 2012
Exhibit 45: Business Segmentation of Siemens AG 2012
Exhibit 46: Employee Structure of Siemens AG by Region 2012
Exhibit 47: R&D Facilities of Siemens AG by Region 2012[/toggle]

[toggle title_open=”Summary” title_closed=”Summary” hide=”yes” border=”yes” style=”default” excerpt_length=”0″ read_more_text=”Read More” read_less_text=”Read Less” include_excerpt_html=”no”]Commenting on the report, an analyst from the team said: “The increased availability of wireless sensor networking solutions in SCADA-based industrial control systems is one of the major emerging trends witnessed in the Global Industrial Automation Control market in recent years. Wireless sensor networking systems help enterprises overcome certain issues related to the rigid architecture of SCADA such as inflexibility and centralized architecture. With this technology, deployment of sensors in SCADA-based industrial control systems becomes easier as it provides wireless networking access. For instance, in the Energy and Power industry, sensors are generally deployed in either production or induction wells. Through wireless sensor technology, the sensors can be deployed inside gas pipelines in a cost-effective manner, thereby resulting in enhanced process efficiency of the plants.”

According to the report, one of the major drivers in this market is the increasing demand for automation control systems from the Oil and Gas industry. Effective deployment of automation solutions helps companies improve their productivity and enhance their monitoring and security systems.

Further, the report states that one of the major challenges in this market is the reluctance among end-users to migrate to the latest technology. Several organizations in various process industries across the globe find it difficult to shift from their legacy systems to the latest technology because of various technical issues such as interoperability and incompatibility with the existing systems.

The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors.[/toggle]

[toggle title_open=”Companies Mentioned” title_closed=”Companies Mentioned” hide=”yes” border=”yes” style=”default” excerpt_length=”0″ read_more_text=”Read More” read_less_text=”Read Less” include_excerpt_html=”no”]- ABB Ltd.
– Honeywell International Inc.
– Rockwell Automation Inc.
– and Siemens AG.
– Applied Material Inc.
– Apriso Corp.
– Aspen Technologies Inc.
– Camstar Systems Inc.
– Control Systems International Inc.
– Emerson Electric Co.
– Eyelite Inc.
– GE Co.
– Invensys plc.
– Metso Corp.
– Miracom Inc.
– Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd.
– Omron Corp.
– SAP AG
– Schneider Electric SA
– Toshiba International Corp.
– Werum Software & Systems AG
– and Yokogawa Electric Corp.[/toggle]

Sources: www.businesswire.com , researchandmarkets.com

Storytelling

Storytelling is one of the oldest and most powerful forms of communication. A good story well told not only increases audience attention, but is also better remembered than a list of items or facts.

Best Practices

The essential parts to a story — Every story consists of a few essential elements: an initiating incident, a protagonist, action, and an outcome. Unless your material comprises these elements, it won’t be perceived as a story.

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Just telling about an event is not always a story. Not all narratives are stories. A story contains four essential components:

1. Initiating incident. A story must have an impetus, a cause that drives someone to take action. In most stories, this is a problem — or an opportunity. Whether it’s negative (a problem) or positive (an opportunity), the more extreme this incident, the more compelling the story will be.

2. Protagonist. A story has one or more individuals (a team, organization, etc.) trying to achieve a goal caused by the initiating incident.

3. Action. The protagonist takes action to address the problem or opportunity. The story becomes more engaging if obstacles stand in the way of achieving the goal, and make it harder to obtain. The protagonist’s actions to overcome the obstacles can be the most instructive elements in stories.

4. Outcome. Once the problem or opportunity has been revealed and action taken by the protagonist, the audience will want to know what happened. Did the protagonist achieve the goal? Whether your story has a happy ending or not, the outcome must be clear.

Of course, simply having these four elements does not guarantee that a story will be memorable, instructive, or even interesting. It just means you have a genuine story. A story needs something more if it’s to stick.

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Examples of effective storytelling — Exemplar video stories illustrating IBM’s core values.

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  1. Innovation that matters — for our company and the world
  2. Dedication — to every client’s success
  3. Trust and personal responsibility — in all relationships

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Giving your story impact — But compelling stories need more than just the basic elements. Here you’ll learn storyteller “secrets” on how to make a story more powerful.

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Making your story memorable

We suggest you watch each of the video examples in the previous section (Examples of Effective Storytelling) before your review this section.

Each of the video examples had the four basic elements we identified earlier: initiating incident, a protagonist, action, and an outcome.

But these stories go beyond those basic requirement.
Below are story-strengthening elements that can raise a story’s impact. Incorporating any one of these elements can help — adding several can help even more. But whatever element you add, be sure it is genuine and appropriate, not artificially invented to try to increase your story’s power.

1. Something important at stake. A major risk will ratchet up audience interest in a story. In Dick Richardson’s “Mazel Tov” story, IBM attorneys discovered Dick’s omission of a required Sexual Harassment component in the manager program — his own career was in jeopardy because of his mistake. We want to learn what happened!

2Time lock. When a problem or opportunity has a definite deadline, it creates an urgency in the story, raises the tension and peaks audience interest.
3. Expectation violation. When audience expectations are dashed — for a good reason — the story soars.

4. Parsimony. Clutter is the downfall of an otherwise excellent story. A good story has just enough details to establish the situation and characters and move the story events forward. “Parsimony” is the absence of clutter. Aim for it.

5. Reveal information only when needed. One good way to ruin a story is to provide too much needed information all at once. Good storytellers “dribble out” the necessary background as the story is being told, usually just before that information is needed.

6. Obstacles. The initiating event causes the protagonist to take action. But if the goal is easily attained, the story won’t generate much interest. The story really crackles when a protagonist has to be clever or courageous or fortunate to overcome obstacles.

7. Abnormality. Stories stand out and are better remembered if there’s something unusual in them. In Todd Belt’s Katrina story the IBM technicians load their motor home with diapers and other items and head out on their mission. Afterwards they help dig out a homeowner’s possessions from four feet of flood sewage. These memorable descriptions send a striking and important message about this unusual endeavor for IBM techies.

8. Visual salience. A memorable story paints pictures in people’s heads by using visually descriptive phrases that connect with the audience. Dick Richardson begins by saying, “It was a pizza-box-in-the-hallway kind of project,” implying that it took the team an all-hours effort. In her Mentoring story Anne McNeill says the rural school teacher “literally had tears in her eyes” when expressing appreciation to IBM. Using visual description is a solid storytelling technique.

9. Formidable antagonist. In some stories the protagonist must face and overcome an adversary or “antagonist.” It could be a corporate competitor, an uncooperative colleague, or a force of nature. A formidable antagonist makes the story that much more compelling.

10. Underlying meaning. A story worthy of telling carries meaning. The more important the meaning, the more important the story. Sometimes that meaning is explicit and stated, sometimes not. But to lead and instruct, a story must have meaning, or else it simply entertains.

You’ve probably noticed that many of the requirements for good storytelling are the same as any good communications technique employed in a business setting. It must be concise, accurate, clear, impactful, and readable. In today’s world with remote management, virtual teams, and cross-border projects, communications is more important than ever.

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Tools / Job aids

Story capture rubric (18KB PDF) A simple tool that will help you: establish the strength of a possible story, begin to outline the essential elements, and confirm what might be missing to build an effective story.

Storyboard template (111KB PDF) Storyboarding is a series of illustrations or images displayed in an order that shows the progression of a completed motion graphic or interactive sequence. The illustrations may be photos, film clips or rough sketches. Each illustration often has notes describing any dialogue, action and/or special effects (FX) that accompany the scene.

Video production outline.pdf (24KB PDF) Bare-bones list of steps to follow for producing video for learning

[Video Captioning Tutorial] Learn how to create a well structured, designed and impactful videocasts.

FAQ

I don’t think I have any particular talent for writing or telling stories, but I can see situations where they could be effective. Are there ways to develop this skill?] Yes. Classes in creative writing are widely available, as are storytelling workshops. Toastmasters International offers an enjoyable and supportive atmosphere for improving your public speaking talents — crucial to effective storytelling. We all know people who seem to be “natural-born” storytellers. You are correct though in recognizing storytelling as a skill, and like most other skills, storytelling can be improved with knowledge and practice.

Implemented a ROT13 Encryption Web App

The Source Code for the Python Web App using Templates (jinja2):
[sourcecode language="python"]
import os #http://effbot.org/librarybook/os.htm operating system fumctions
import re #http://effbot.org/librarybook/re.htm regular expression module
from string import letters

import webapp2
import jinja2

from google.appengine.ext import db

template_dir = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'templates')
jinja_env = jinja2.Environment(loader = jinja2.FileSystemLoader(template_dir), autoescape = True)

def render_str(template, **params):
t = jinja_env.get_template(template)
return t.render(params)

class MainHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
def render(self, template, **kw):
self.response.out.write(render_str(template, **kw))

def write(self, *a, **kw):
self.response.out.write(*a, **kw)

class Rot13(MainHandler):
def get(self):
self.render('rot13-form.html')

def post(self):
rot13 = ''
text = self.request.get('text')
if text:
rot13 = text.encode('rot13')

self.render('rot13-form.html', text=rot13)

app = webapp2.WSGIApplication([
('/', Rot13)],
debug=True)
[/sourcecode]
Source code for the Template positioned in a folder 'templates':
[sourcecode language="html"]</pre>
<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
<head>
<title>Unit 2 Rot 13</title>
</head>

<body>
<h2>Enter some text to ROT13:</h2>
<form method="post">
<textarea name="text"
style="height: 100px; width: 400px;">{{text}}</textarea>
<br>
<input type="submit">
</form>
</body>

</html>[/sourcecode]