Regular Feedback Cycles Pattern: How I should embrace more feedback

Feedback is the most valuable thing that one might get, as without feedback it is tremendously hard to improve. While I think I do a good job, I want to do a great job. To enable this I will apply the following at least once a month:
  • I consider who can help me grow and I seek them out.
  • I am clear that I want honest feedback.
  • I ask open-ended questions (not yes or no) on what I can do better in the future.
  • I listen and ensure I am open to hear the feedback.
  • I express thanks and play back the feedback that I heard.
  • I ask if I accurately heard the feedback—if I need to, make adjustments and play back again.
  • I decide how to move forward

You can find the complete pattern description below.

I will apply this in the private and the professional areas. As I think growth is important in every part of my life. The first persons I will ask will be four persons which opinions I value: my brother, my girlfriend, my manager and a client. In fact I will schedule the first meeting right now.
I can only encourage you to do the same and I will keep you up to date how this works out for me.
THE PATTERN DESCRIPTION:
name:
regular feedback cycles
problem:
How to realise what is the best area to spend your limited time improving?
context/situation:
You are active in your life every day, at work or at home. And you do your daily routines and interactions with others. And you produce results.
conflicting issues:

There is you who wants to get stuff done and don’t waste time on feedback.

There is you who needs to know where to spend your limited time to improve.

There is other people who expect you to improve but don’t speak their mind for not wanting to offend you or not having the time.

There is other people who also have limited time to give you feedback.

solution:
          Establish a feedback culture with important people/stakeholders in your life:
          I consider who can help me grow and I seek them out.
          I am clear that I want honest feedback.
          I ask open-ended questions (not yes or no) on what I can do better in the future.
          – what you can keep?
          – what should start?
        – what you should stop?
        I listen and ensure I am open to hear the feedback.
        I express thanks and play back the feedback that I heard.
        I ask if I accurately heard the feedback—if I need to, make adjustments and play back again.
        I decide how to move forward
resulting context:

benefits:

People get comfortable giving you feedback.

You get feedback and know where to spend you time to improve.

issues to resolve:

how to find the right people to get you feedback.

how to do it regularly.

how to act on the feedback.

related patterns: